#ElaniSpeaks: Music Copyright Society of Kenya under attack again

Despite the pomp and colour that was witnessed few nights ago as Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) launched the Annual Music Talent Awards Gala (MAMTAG), the body finds itself waddling in fresh controversy with music group Elani now accusing it of transparency issues.

In a say it all interview posted on YouTube, the group breaks the silence on where they have been and reveal despite the success of their hit songs like Kookoo, Milele, Barua and others, they have nothing to smile about, but debts. When they made noise about royalties, they were paid a cheque Sh31,000 which did not make sense.

They visited MCSK offices who stated that they do not monitor all radio stations and further accused the stations of not submitting the correct log forms. Five days later, they were called by MCSK and given a compensatory cheque of Shs300,000 by the Collective Monitory Organisation. The group now wants MSCK to open it’s books to auditors and pay artistes their dues.

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“We have been silent for a long time. After a successful year and several releases we realized that a loophole exists in the industry. A problem affecting musicians must be discussed. The structures within the music industry in Kenya have failed the musician. Those entrusted to distribute the money which is generated by our hard work have failed us.

“The organizations whose sole purpose is to manage and distribute the funds that our blood, sweat and tears have created have failed us. We spent all we had to make the best music we could. We sincerely deserve to get our due. Being a musician is a job. It is an investment. It takes an incredible amount of time, money, persistence and effort.

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“It needs to make sense. But we are stuck in a vicious cycle where a song is played and the finances owed to the creator are stuck in a black hole that can’t quite be found. As it stands, a select few continue to siphon money that artists have worked hard to earn. The money generated disappears and finds its way into pockets that are not ours.

“We are not giving our all, only to sit back and watch another person buy a new Range Rover by our sweat. So we need to change the structure. about the . Something needs to change,” the group posted on their social media pages.

Here is a link to the interview they posted on YouTube >>>

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