NATIONALNEWSPeople Daily

Governments accused of ignoring charter to fight graft

Alvin Mwangi @PeopleDailyKe

The commissioner for political affairs in the African Union, Minata Samate, has accused African governments of laxity in the implementation of the African Charter on the Values and Principles of Public Service and Administration.

Speaking at the Kenya School of Government on Tuesday, Samate, called on countries that have signed the charter to work with speed to implement it.

“The level of development in countries will largely depend on how fast this charter is implemented,” she said.

During the launch of the 1st conference since the African Charter was signed, Samate said the AU is in the process of drafting guidelines on how the charter will be implemented.   

Public Service, Youth and Gender Affairs Cabinet secretary Margaret Kobia challenged African countries represented to mobilise others to join the charter.

So far, only 33 countries in Africa have signed the Charter but none has implemented it.

Kobia said upon implementation, governments will be in better placed to address accountability from public officers and fight corruption.

“Public Service and Administration shall endeavour to establish a human resource policy framework and plan for the effective and efficient operation,” reads the Charter in part.

The delegates discussed among other issues the ratification of the report saying it is crucial for realisation of Agenda 2063.

They agreed to adopt an inter-ministerial strategy in their governments, as well as public participation to ensure seamless implementation of the Charter.

Kobia said once executed, governments will have clear guidelines on how to deal with corrupt public officers.

“As a country, we are committed to implementing the Charter to help manage public service operations and address corruption which has tainted the image of the government,” she said.

Burundi, Congo, Tanzania, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Algeria and South Africa were some of the countries present.

Show More

Related Articles