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Obado to spend two more weeks in remand

Migori Governor Okoth Obado and his two aides will remain longer in remand  after the High Court on Friday set their bail ruling for October 24.

That means the governor, his personal assistant Michael Oyamo and Caspal Obiero, a clerk at the Migori county government, who have been charged with the murder of Rongo University student Sharon Otieno, will spend another two weeks at the Industrial Area remand awaiting the ruling.

Justice Jessie Lessit set the date after hearing from both parties on the defence’s application for bail.

The governor, who was charged last month with the murder of Sharon and her unborn baby, has been at Industrial Area Remand Prison since September 21.

He was denied bail on September 27 by the same judge, saying the Prosecution was yet to supply all the parties with witness statements and evidence.

Lessit had ruled that only after the committal bundles had been supplied would the court make its decision on the bail application.

Yesterday, the governor made a fresh application for bail saying he suffers from severe back problem known as Nerve Compression Disc lesion on the lumber spine which started in 2013. He said the condition had worsened since he was remanded.

Through his lawyers Nicholas Ombija, Rogers Sagana and Cliff Ombeta, the governor urged the court to adopt the previous admission on bail application.

Ombija argued that Obado was arrested due to public pressure and his detention had caused him, his family and the people of Migori county, a lot of suffering.

The lawyer said Obado is not a flight risks.

“Fundamental cause of bail is to secure attendance in court. The accused is not a flight risk as he is the governor of Migori County,” Ombija argued.

But the prosecution led by Jacob Ondari and Alexander Muteti opposed the application arguing that bail was not an absolute right.

Ondari told Justice Lessit that the seriousness of the offence and the possibility of witness interference was a consideration for denial of bail.

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