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Cyclist wins Mt Kenya bike race for fifth time

Veteran cyclist David Kinja has reclaimed the title ‘King of the Mountain’ at the Tropic Air 10 to 4 Mountain Bike challenge event held last weekend from his teammate Davidson Kamau.

This was his fifth win since he started participating in the Mt Kenya race held annually at an altitude ranging from 10,000ft to 4,000ft (hence 10’to4’ ). The event attracted over 400 participants from across the globe— from as far as USA, Japan and New Zealand to as near as Timau, Meru county.

Mt Kenya Trust, a non-governmental organisation which works to conserve Mt Kenya’s environment.

event programme was the biggest as it had three new events; The Enduro, The Altitude Horse Ride and The Chase.

Kinja won both the 90km Hardcore Day One and the 64km roller coaster Classic Day Two races coming in a total of 28 minutes ahead of his teammates. He even managed a personal best time, completing the day one race in sub-four hours for the first time.

backed out of the race 100 metres before the finish line after his bicycle experienced mechanical problems.

Kinja said he was happy to win the title at the age of 46 and hopes his efforts are an inspiration to younger cyclists. “I hope in the future, more youngsters would take up the title and keep going, something I passionately work with my Safari Simbas Cycling Trust,” he said.

The winners were awarded cash prizes and bicycle products. “Mount Kenya is the heart and lungs of the country and is vital part of Kenya’s economic and environmental prosperity. Thanks to the funds raised by everyone who took part in this year’s 10to4, we are able to continue to protect its forests and fragile ecosystems,” said Susie Weeks, Mount Kenya Trust’s Executive Director.

She said the funds raised will go to the conservation projects in one of Kenya’s major elephant corridors, including the reforestation of more than two million trees in the national reserve and facilitating five security teams who help to reduce illegal logging and poaching.

The money will also support community health projects for over 40,000 people, human-wildlife conflict mitigation, fire fighting support and education.

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